Apple hardware

How do P3 displays affect your workflow? — CreativePro.com article

Some new displays use a color space called P3, which is different than the sRGB and Adobe RGB color spaces that designers and photographers have used for years. Is P3 an improvement, or a complication? I answer that question in an article I wrote for CreativePro.

Read my article at the following link:

How do P3 displays affect your workflow?

That article refines the observations about P3 displays that I originally explored in an earlier article on this blog, A look at the P3 color gamut of the iMac display (Retina, Late 2015). I wrote the earlier article when Apple first starting shipping P3 display built into the Late 2015 iMac. Today, Apple includes P3 displays in their top-of-the-line iMacs, MacBook Pros, iPhones, and iPad Pros.

Astropad vs Duet Pro: Two Cintiq challengers

If you’ve wanted to use a mobile tablet as a Wacom Cintiq-like graphics input device for your computer, for a long time Astropad was the app that many turned to (a company called Avatron also offers Air Display for iOS and Air Stylus for Android). Now Duet, Inc. has introduced Duet Pro. These solutions display desktop applications such as Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator on an iPad, letting you use a stylus on the iPad display to draw or paint directly on the desktop document.

Both Astropad and Duet Pro are much less expensive than a Wacom Cintiq…if you already own an iPad. If you’re deciding which one to use, you’ll need to know the important differences between them.

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9.7-inch iPad Pro

iPad Pro 9.7 inch and iOS 9.3: Color management progress

The 9.7-inch iPad Pro and iOS 9.3 demonstrate that Apple is gradually implementing color management in iOS, and has made it available to developers. While the presence of color management isn’t obvious on the surface, Apple has added multiple new features that would typically depend on color management.

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30-bit display color is now supported by OS X and Photoshop

For many years, Photoshop users and other graphics professionals have wanted proper support for 10-bits-per-channel video displays (also known as 30-bit when counting the three RGB channels together) on Macs. This isn’t about the file format, but the data path to the video monitor. The 8 bits per channel displays almost all of us use today may show banding when displaying gradients, especially in grayscale images, shadows, and in colors dominated by a single channel. That banding goes away on 10bpc displays because of the additional display levels available to each channel.

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