Adobe Illustrator

Secrets of the Esc Key: CreativePro.com article

In Adobe software, the enigmatic Esc key can do more than you might expect. You might already know that you can use the Esc key as a shortcut for the Cancel button in dialog boxes, but there are some less obvious but quite useful ways that the Esc key can save you time in applications such as Adobe Photoshop, Adobe InDesign, and Adobe Illustrator.

Read the full article at the following link:

Secrets of the Esc Key

How do P3 displays affect your workflow? — CreativePro.com article

Some new displays use a color space called P3, which is different than the sRGB and Adobe RGB color spaces that designers and photographers have used for years. Is P3 an improvement, or a complication? I answer that question in an article I wrote for CreativePro.

Read my article at the following link:

How do P3 displays affect your workflow?

That article refines the observations about P3 displays that I originally explored in an earlier article on this blog, A look at the P3 color gamut of the iMac display (Retina, Late 2015). I wrote the earlier article when Apple first starting shipping P3 display built into the Late 2015 iMac. Today, Apple includes P3 displays in their top-of-the-line iMacs, MacBook Pros, iPhones, and iPad Pros.

macOS 10.12 Sierra image, courtesy Apple Inc.

macOS 10.12 Sierra: Will Adobe software work?

Now that macOS 10.12 Sierra is available from the Mac App Store, you’re probably wondering whether your Adobe software will work in the new Mac operating system.

With every Mac system upgrade, information about compatibility is often not available on the first day the new system is available, and emerges over time. If you use your Mac to run a business or as a serious hobby, do not upgrade to Sierra until you’re prepared to recover if things don’t work out. (That applies to any operating system upgrade on any device.) Wait until you are confident that all of your software and hardware is compatible, then back up everything, then upgrade. With that in mind, here’s what I know so far about the state of Adobe software in Sierra.

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Read my overview of Adobe Comp CC in InDesign Magazine

Read my overview of Adobe Comp CC in InDesign Magazine

It’s a time-honored tradition to sketch a design idea on the nearest piece of paper, such as the back of an envelope or a cocktail napkin. You then have to take that paper over to your computer and manually translate the sketch into a document you can take through production to final output. Today, with Adobe Comp CC on the Apple iPad, you can design layouts by sketching gestures with nothing more than your fingers. You can then send that design directly to Adobe InDesign CC, Adobe Photoshop CC, or Adobe Illustrator CC as a fully editable layout, ready for immediate refinement and production.

I take a step-by-step look at this mobile and fully digital idea-to-production workflow in Issue 77 of InDesign Magazine. If you just want to read the article, Adobe has made it available as a free PDF at this link:
InStep: Adobe Comp CC

Here’s the whole issue (paid):
InDesign Magazine, Issue 77: Fresh Tips

The issue’s called Fresh Tips because it features a long list of genuinely useful InDesign productivity tips…I’m learning from them myself! In addition to my article on Adobe Comp CC, the issue also introduces the new Publish Online feature in InDesign.

The article is part of an issue of InDesign Magazine that you can buy as a single issue or as part of a subscription. You can download a free trial issue, and you can save $10 when you sign up for a 1-year membership by using this coupon code: friend.

InDesign Magazine is a bimonthly PDF periodical devoted entirely to Adobe InDesign and to the thriving community of InDesign professionals. With editorial direction by page-layout guru and author David Blatner and CreativePro.com editor in chief Mike Rankin, InDesign Magazine brings you the in-depth features, reviews, and tutorials you need to master Adobe InDesign.

Which Size Graphics Tablet Should You Buy? — CreativePro.com article

A graphics tablet with a pressure-sensitive stylus is an essential purchase for many creative professionals. Once you decide to buy one, a big question is which size you should get: Small, medium, or large? The answer is not always obvious, so I discuss your options in an article I wrote for CreativePro.com.

The article is about graphics tablets that replace your computer’s mouse or trackpad, not the pen displays that let you draw directly on the screen or standalone tablets such as the Apple iPad.

Want the whole story? Click the link below to read my article at CreativePro.com:
Which Size Graphics Tablet Should You Buy?

Which Size Graphics Tablet Should You Buy?