Travel photo tips on Adobe Live with the Pros

You’ve come back from a trip, and you’ve loaded your travel photos from your memory cards onto your computer. What next? Adobe Community Professionals Melissa Piccone, Jesús Ramirez, Theresa Jackson and I walk through some of our favorite Photoshop and Lightroom tips for travel photos. My segment, which is about creating panoramas in Photoshop and Lightroom, starts about 30 minutes into the recording. But it’s worth watching all four presenters.

Watch the show, originally streamed live on March 16, 2017:

Adobe Live with the Pros: Photoshop and Lightroom (65 minutes)

Note: Watching the recording requires the Adobe Connect web browser add-in, which is available on Macs and Windows PCs but not on all desktop and mobile platforms. (My understanding is that when an Adobe Connect presentation is live, you can watch it on any devices listed in the Adobe Connect system requirements.)

macOS 10.12 Sierra image, courtesy Apple Inc.

macOS 10.12 Sierra: Will Adobe software work?

Now that macOS 10.12 Sierra is available from the Mac App Store, you’re probably wondering whether your Adobe software will work in the new Mac operating system.

With every Mac system upgrade, information about compatibility is often not available on the first day the new system is available, and emerges over time. If you use your Mac to run a business or as a serious hobby, do not upgrade to Sierra until you’re prepared to recover if things don’t work out. (That applies to any operating system upgrade on any device.) Wait until you are confident that all of your software and hardware is compatible, then back up everything, then upgrade. With that in mind, here’s what I know so far about the state of Adobe software in Sierra.

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Featured image for the article "Creating a Panorama- Photoshop, Camera Raw, or Lightroom?"

Creating a Panorama: CreativePro.com article

You can merge multiple images into a panorama in Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Camera Raw (which comes with Photoshop), and Adobe Photoshop Lightroom. But don’t assume they create panoramas the same way. In fact they work differently, but those differences give you more ways to resolve potential panorama issues.

How do you choose which method to use? I answer that question in an article for CreativePro.com, which you can read at the following link:

Creating a Panorama: Photoshop, Camera Raw, or Lightroom?

The Unexpected Rebirth of Adobe DNG: CreativePro.com article

The Adobe Digital Negative (DNG) format started out as an open file format for saving raw image data from the sensor in a digital camera. While DNG hasn’t exactly become a household name, I recently began to notice that DNG has come into wider use behind the scenes in several Adobe and non-Adobe photo workflows, and not just for camera raw files. What makes this possible is the inherent versatility that Adobe built into the DNG format. Are you already using DNG without even knowing it?

Read my full article for CreativePro.com at the following link:

The Unexpected Rebirth of Adobe DNG

Secrets of the Esc Key: CreativePro.com article

In Adobe software, the enigmatic Esc key can do more than you might expect. You might already know that you can use the Esc key as a shortcut for the Cancel button in dialog boxes, but there are some less obvious but quite useful ways that the Esc key can save you time in applications such as Adobe Photoshop, Adobe InDesign, and Adobe Illustrator.

Read the full article at the following link:

Secrets of the Esc Key

Creating Image Vignettes: InDesign Magazine article

An image vignette is a time-honored way to draw attention to the subject of an image by darkening or fading its edges. Because InDesign isn’t an image editor, you might naturally decide to add a vignette to an image in Adobe Photoshop before importing it into Adobe InDesign. But you can actually create image vignettes easily in InDesign. And an image vignette you create in InDesign can be more flexible than a vignette created in Photoshop. Most importantly, saving an InDesign image vignette as an Object Style makes it easy to apply and edit a vignette consistently across a large number of images in the same InDesign document, such as a catalog.

My friends at InDesign Magazine asked me to explore InDesign image vignettes for the May 2017 issue. In my article Creating Image Vignettes I write about several approaches to creating different types of image vignettes.

InDesign Magazine is a bimonthly PDF periodical devoted entirely to Adobe InDesign and to the thriving community of InDesign professionals. With editorial direction by page-layout guru and author David Blatner and CreativePro.com editor in chief Mike Rankin, InDesign Magazine brings you the in-depth features, reviews, and tutorials you need to master Adobe InDesign.

Premium members of InDesign Secrets get the latest issue of InDesign Magazine plus access to all back issues. An InDesign Secrets premium membership may interest you if you want to advance your InDesign skills with the help of some of the most knowledgeable InDesign users in the industry.

CreativePro article: Five Faster Ways to Get Images Into Photoshop

Five Faster Ways to Get Images Into Photoshop: CreativePro.com article

The Open command and double-clicking aren’t the only ways to get images into Photoshop. Learn new ways to more efficiently open images in Photoshop, individually or several at once, and directly from other applications such as Adobe Lightroom, Apple Photos, and Adobe Bridge instead of having to export and import through the desktop every time. Add new tricks to your toolbox, become more efficient, and open up new creative possibilities.

Read my article at the following link:

Five Faster Ways to Get Images Into Photoshop