Adobe

Featured image for the article "Creating a Panorama- Photoshop, Camera Raw, or Lightroom?"

Creating a Panorama: CreativePro.com article

You can merge multiple images into a panorama in Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Camera Raw (which comes with Photoshop), and Adobe Photoshop Lightroom. But don’t assume they create panoramas the same way. In fact they work differently, but those differences give you more ways to resolve potential panorama issues.

How do you choose which method to use? I answer that question in an article for CreativePro.com, which you can read at the following link:

Creating a Panorama: Photoshop, Camera Raw, or Lightroom?

The Unexpected Rebirth of Adobe DNG: CreativePro.com article

The Adobe Digital Negative (DNG) format started out as an open file format for saving raw image data from the sensor in a digital camera. While DNG hasn’t exactly become a household name, I recently began to notice that DNG has come into wider use behind the scenes in several Adobe and non-Adobe photo workflows, and not just for camera raw files. What makes this possible is the inherent versatility that Adobe built into the DNG format. Are you already using DNG without even knowing it?

Read my full article for CreativePro.com at the following link:

The Unexpected Rebirth of Adobe DNG

Getting the Most Out of the Adobe User Forums (featured image)

Getting the Most Out of the Adobe User Forums: CreativePro.com article

In an article I wrote for CreativePro, you’ll learn some simple strategies to help you get a great answer more quickly in the Adobe Forums — a free community-based resource for questions about Adobe software such as Photoshop and InDesign. Many forum members use Adobe software in production every day, so they can have useful insights and are sometimes aware of problems before they’re officially documented by Adobe. I’ve participated in the Adobe Forums for many years, and am now an Adobe Community Professional there.

Read my article at the following link:

Getting the Most Out of the Adobe User Forums

Choosing an Adobe Portfolio Layout: CreativePro.com article

Choosing an Adobe Portfolio Layout is a companion article to one I wrote earlier for CreativePro (Using Adobe Portfolio). This article helps you decide which Adobe Portfolio layout should be the basis for your website. What really drives your choice out of the seven layouts currently available? What can you change about the layout you choose? Is it easy to change your mind?

If “build my website” is still on your To Do list, Adobe Portfolio is a quick and easy way to get a focused body of work online. Especially if you’re an Adobe Creative Cloud member, since Adobe Portfolio is available only as a benefit of an Creative Cloud membership (including the $9.99/month Photography Plan).

You can read the article at the following link:

Choosing an Adobe Portfolio Layout

Using Adobe Portfolio: CreativePro.com article

If “build my website” is still on your To Do list, Adobe Portfolio is a quick and easy way to get a focused body of work online. Especially if you’re an Adobe Creative Cloud member, since Adobe Portfolio is available only as a benefit of an Creative Cloud membership (including the $9.99/month Photography Plan).

How does Adobe Portfolio compare to the long list of other and often more established web-browser-based site builders? How easy is it to learn and use Portfolio? Does it have the features that photographers and designers need to show their best work?

I try it out and then tell you what I think in my article for CreativePro.com, which you can read at the following link:

Using Adobe Portfolio